Salvage up my street 

Salvaged Arts and Crafts hall stand
Salvaged Arts and Crafts hall stand

So far, I have salvaged an Arts and Crafts hall stand and the below late sixties lithograph poster from a Chagall exhibition at the Maeght Foundation in St Paul. I knew the Edwardian hall stand had value, but it was not until I researched the poster that I found it offered for sale online for hundreds and even over a thousand pounds, depending on the condition. Both salvages were guided by my love for the thing in the street rather than how much the items were worth. However, it got me thinking about the value assigned to objects and how that influences their future and chance of reuse. 

1967 Chagall lithograph poster Maeght Foundation in St Paul
Salvaged 1967 lithograph Chagall poster from Maeght Foundation in St Paul

We moved to a neighbourhood just next door, yet we never used to see anything in the streets of our old hood. My speculations consider many possible reasons – the most obvious being a different borough equals different attitudes to “fly-tipping”. However, our new neighbourhood has a greater sense of community and more diversity with a greater mix of cultural norms. Sure, some residents are just dumping what they deem to be waste, but I also witness carefully displayed belongings and books that feel less of a nuisance and more like a nice neighbourly gesture. When the owner treats something with value, even when it is no longer of use to them, you can feel the difference, and the likelihood it will be reused increases. Although, the lonely feeling of this picture with cracked glass left as rubbish also evoked an urge in me to rescue it. 

It was not until we picked up the poster to carry it home that I noticed a postcard from the same museum tucked in the back of the frame. The note read, exactly as you would hope with great intrigue: ‘You didn’t miss much on set but how lovely it is here and at the Colombe. The ‘regulars’ are here – And behind the walls is serene.’ 

Maeght Foundation postcard from the 1960s
Sixties Maeght Foundation postcard

Yet more research led me to the story of La Colombe d’Or Hotel and the wall, to which I believe the note refers. A meeting place for artists and thinkers, an expansion of the small hotel included a facade made of stones reclaimed from an old castle in Aix-en-Provence. See the works from some of the hotel guests below…

Work credited to Swiss sculptor Jean Tinguely at La Colombe d'Or Hotel
Work credited to Swiss sculptor Jean Tinguely © La Colombe d’Or
Guest book with Charlie Chaplin sketch credited to Miró at La Colombe d'Or Hotel
Guest book with Charlie Chaplin sketch credited to Miró © La Colombe d’Or

Internet resale value excluded, the poster holds more meaning to me with this rare glimpse into its past. I learned that the architect Jacques Couelle, credited for initiating architecture like sculpture, designed a fireplace at the same hotel with hand imprints of the people who helped to build it. It’s easier to disregard stuff that strangers don’t want, but once you know the story of the people, stuff suddenly feels more significant.

Ceramic by Fernand Leger for the terrace at La Colombe d'Or Hotel
Ceramic by Fernand Leger for the terrace © La Colombe d’Or

Try SalvoWEB if your street is lacking in good salvage

The Maeght Foundation

La Colombe d’Or Hotel

© Photographs Reclaimed Woman and courtesy of La Colombe d’Or Hotel

Six Items Challenge : Two weeks in

Two weeks into six weeks wearing the same six items of clothes, I am tongue twisting and definitely compensating with shoes.

On a side note, these 1940s pigeon holes make perfect shoe storage   (complete with drawn-on letters, this piece was reclaimed from the post room at Kings Cross Station).

©Photographs Reclaimed Woman

 

Recipe for a reclaimed kitchen – my kitchen after

I recently transformed my kitchen into a walk-in wardrobe and my living room into my kitchen, so I thought this was a recipe worth sharing.

My kitchen before

Tiny kitchens are the norm in flats in London and although at one stage I merely used mine to reheat or “cook” salad, this was my chance to make a space I wanted to spend time in.  The original kitchen was a cavelike windowless room, far more suited to clothing than cooking.

Materials

cooker hood –  organ pipes salvaged from a church in east London by The Architectural Forum with an Arts & Crafts fireplace from Haes  to house an extractor fan and spotlights

wall cabinet – 1940s staff noticeboard salvaged from Kings Cross station on SalvoWEB with gold knobs saved from a built-in wardrobe that was in my bedroom.  The back of the noticeboard was removed so the glass doors could be mounted in front of shelves made of reclaimed wood from Pine Supplies

lights – Deco lampshades from The Architectural Forum

radiator – old panel radiator, reclaimed, restored and painted black by The Architectural Forum

cooker and dishwasher – reused from the old kitchen with a new gas hob to replace the old electric hot plates

splashback – reclaimed marble scraps from sculptor John Joekes 

cabinets – reused carcasses from the old kitchen with doors made of gymnasium floorboards salvaged from a school near Berlin by Historische Bauelemente

worktop – reclaimed wood lab top salvaged from a school by Source Antiques

sink – Armitage Shanks butler sink salvaged from a local yard with brass bib taps from Catchpole & Rye

vintage glass – Libbey Glass tumblers from Olde Good Things

accessories – church pew umbrella drip trays styled as worktop trays from Church Antiques and old kilner jars from Metroretro

vintage crockery – including green Beryl Ware plates and bowls from Insitu

original oak floor

Method

I spent over seven months sourcing salvage.  Designing a kitchen with reused and reclaimed materials doesn’t require such a long cooking time, but I wanted the chance to get to know the space.  Although the old kitchen was dingy and dated, it was fine for my first months in the flat.

Consulting SalvoWEB throughout the journey, I set about realising the reclaimed dream I sketched on a napkin in New York.  I rarely found what I imagined, but one ingredient led to the next and my taste matured.  I originally envisaged a glamorous kitchen to prove that salvage could look polished, but I fell for honest materials and I wanted to feel their provenance.  I love the fact that girls were playing games back in 1910 on floorboards that now front my kitchen doors.  What could be more glamorous than that?

©Photographs Reclaimed Woman