Recipe for a reclaimed kitchen – my kitchen after

I recently transformed my kitchen into a walk-in wardrobe and my living room into my kitchen, so I thought this was a recipe worth sharing.

My kitchen before

Tiny kitchens are the norm in flats in London and although at one stage I merely used mine to reheat or “cook” salad, this was my chance to make a space I wanted to spend time in.  The original kitchen was a cavelike windowless room, far more suited to clothing than cooking.

Materials

cooker hood –  organ pipes salvaged from a church in east London by The Architectural Forum with an Arts & Crafts fireplace from Haes  to house an extractor fan and spotlights

wall cabinet – 1940s staff noticeboard salvaged from Kings Cross station on SalvoWEB with gold knobs saved from a built-in wardrobe that was in my bedroom.  The back of the noticeboard was removed so the glass doors could be mounted in front of shelves made of reclaimed wood from Pine Supplies

lights – Deco lampshades from The Architectural Forum

radiator – old panel radiator, reclaimed, restored and painted black by The Architectural Forum

cooker and dishwasher – reused from the old kitchen with a new gas hob to replace the old electric hot plates

splashback – reclaimed marble scraps from sculptor John Joekes 

cabinets – reused carcasses from the old kitchen with doors made of gymnasium floorboards salvaged from a school near Berlin by Historische Bauelemente

worktop – reclaimed wood lab top salvaged from a school by Source Antiques

sink – Armitage Shanks butler sink salvaged from a local yard with brass bib taps from Catchpole & Rye

vintage glass – Libbey Glass tumblers from Olde Good Things

accessories – church pew umbrella drip trays styled as worktop trays from Church Antiques and old kilner jars from Metroretro

vintage crockery – including green Beryl Ware plates and bowls from Insitu

original oak floor

Method

I spent over seven months sourcing salvage.  Designing a kitchen with reused and reclaimed materials doesn’t require such a long cooking time, but I wanted the chance to get to know the space.  Although the old kitchen was dingy and dated, it was fine for my first months in the flat.

Consulting SalvoWEB throughout the journey, I set about realising the reclaimed dream I sketched on a napkin in New York.  I rarely found what I imagined, but one ingredient led to the next and my taste matured.  I originally envisaged a glamorous kitchen to prove that salvage could look polished, but I fell for honest materials and I wanted to feel their provenance.  I love the fact that girls were playing games back in 1910 on floorboards that now front my kitchen doors.  What could be more glamorous than that?

©Photographs Reclaimed Woman

Reclaimed Kitchen Before and (almost) After

Transforming my kitchen into a walk-in wardrobe might sound crazy, but as you can see above, my windowless eighties kitchen was destined for new life.   I reused bits from the old kitchen and moved it to the back of the living room to make the most of the biggest room in my flat.

Sourcing inspiration and materials took me from my mum’s shed to New York where the sketching started.  This is my photo diary.

Sketching my kitchen at The Butcher’s Daughter a.k.a the vegetable slaughter house of New York City.

Running around Manhattan, I might as well have been wearing nothing but a fig leaf in the lack of layers I packed for a New York winter.  I finally made it to reclaimed renovation heaven The Demolition Depot. Doors, windows, shutters, sanitaryware, stone, irreplaceable artefacts and cats, lots of cats.

I didn’t go as ornate as this radiator, but my drop-in at Demolition Depot confirmed my preference for black.  Fun rad fact: matt black is one of the best choices for radiant heat (the kind that heats bodies). Can you tell I’m now obsessed with any tricks to keep myself warm…

Remember when I found a Belfast sink sitting in my mum’s back garden?  Well, this time I almost took this wooden sink surround.  I should add, my mum is also in the middle of a renovation, she doesn’t normally store salvage in her shed.  However, I decided my worktop needed to be one long strip of something to avoid overcrowding the small kitchen with too many materials.  That one stays with you ma.

SalvoWEB had me seeing salvage from London’s Kings Cross station and I chose the glazed 1940s staff noticeboard above to fashion as my overhead kitchen cabinets.  I had been eyeing-up vintage English Rose kitchens, but this design decision put me on a different train towards Historische Bauelemente where I found these gymnasium floorboards (circa 1910) salvaged from a school near Berlin.   These will be the doors for my old kitchen carcasses.

Organ pipes from The Architectural Forum salvaged from a church in East London were transformed into a decorative extractor fan pipe for the Arts and Crafts fireplace from Haes that I styled as my cooker hood and splashback.  And breathe.  My most ambitious use of salvage so far…

I will be back with the big (small) reclaimed kitchen reveal soon.